The Looking Glass Wars (#1)

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So. I haven’t posted for a couple of weeks because I was up north at my cottage, and the wifi was down. Talk about a champagne problem. I had to spend my time watching the kids swim while sitting on the dock, drinking wine and reading. It was tough. But it did give me some time to start working through my TBR pile!

Another retelling, this one of Alice in Wonderland. Full disclosure. I have never been the biggest fan of Lewis Carroll’s novel. It just never really grabbed my attention when I was younger, and I haven’t really felt the urge to revisit it now. So I am looking at Beddor’s story through new eyes. And I think it is the right way to read this novel, the first in a series of three.

7-year-old Alyss Heart, the heir to the throne of Wonderland, has just celebrated her birthday and is learning to control her powerful imagination. Full of mischief and fun, she uses her powers for amusement, dreading the day she will become Queen, and have to do all the boring stuff that goes with the wearing the Crown. But her peaceful life is disrupted violently when her estranged Aunt Redd and her Cat assassin attacks the Crystal Palace and destroys her future. Hatter Madigan, trusted Royal guardian and advisor, escapes through the Pool of Tears with Alyss to save her, but loses her in the time stream. After emerging through street puddle into Victorian London, Alyss fears she will never find her way back.

Purists will probably hate this book, but I didn’t. Beddor definitely takes liberties with the original (he starts by stating the Carroll got it all wrong) and adds a fantastical sci-fi element that held my attention.

The characters were good, if a bit underdeveloped. Although as this is the first book in the series, there is always room for that to change as the story progresses. The exception is Alyss. The story begins with her at age 7, but she seems to be written older, which was confusing at first. That problem is ironed out, and her true age matches up much more smoothly with her actions. The story takes place over more than a dozen years, with Alyss going through many changes beyond her control. Beddor handles the different transitions well, and Alyss’ final identity is strong and the natural conclusion to her difficult growth.

Hatter, the Cat, Dodge Anders, Bibwit Harte, are all recognizable characters, even as they take on fantastical new roles. I think Beddor assumed a bit too much for their background because they all appear fully formed, but they seamlessly fit into the story.

The political struggle and resulting war in Wonderland are just dressing for the main storyline. They are well done. But the main plot line, that of Alyss searching for herself and validation of her life will resonate with most readers. She fights a constant battle to remember who she is in the face of others denying her story, and she struggles to hold on to her history. Her loss of self hinders her ability to help her people win the war; the rebuilding of her identity is the lynchpin to the entire story.

What I think is absolutely outstanding is Beddor’s world-building. Our world is somewhat behind Wonderland in technology and unknowingly relies on the fantasy world for our innovation and progress. Driven by the power of imagination, Wonderlanders imagine everything from gas lamps and hot air balloons to internal combustion engines that are then transferred to our world through a series of crystals, where someone here “invents” them. Incredible!

This is a successful retelling of Alice in Wonderland. Again, not for the purists, but if you are looking for an action-packed, often gory look at the adventures, this is a good book for you. I am hoping the that few issues I found with the first book are ironed out with the next two.

The Looking Glass Wars was published September 26th, 2006 by Dial Books.

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8 thoughts on “The Looking Glass Wars (#1)

  1. My niece is seven years old. As much as I love her, I can’t image reading a whole book about what she does told from her perspective. Seven is really, really young! However, did I mention to you at some point that there is a retelling of Cinderella as a steam punk novel? I feel like I did….and the author is writing more. Here’s the website: http://www.betsycornwell.com/books/

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  2. I wish I had self-imposed blogging ban that would force me to only read! :p

    Ok, so I like retellings as much as the next person, but I’m starting to be a little put off at the number of them being released every year. I always have loved Alice In Wonderland, though, so getting tired of its retellings may take me a while. I’m also not a purist and love fantastical sci-fi elements, so this book sounds like a winner to me!

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    1. A blogging holiday recharges the batteries! And it is so nice to just finish a book and then pick up the next one, instead of rushing off to write down my thoughts… (Also TOTALLY appeals to my lazy side…) 🙂

      There are a LOT of retellings out right now, aren’t there? I’m a bit surprised how many I keep coming across, and same as you, I get a bit hesitant to read them. But then a good one sucks me right back in!

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